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epilepsy_awareness

 
Epilepsy Awareness Program - Seizure First Aid

First aid is an essential part of life and every person should know it for their own good.
Knowing how to help someone during and after an epileptic seizure may help you, and them, feel more confident if a seizure happens.
First aid for epilepsy is basically very simple. It keeps the person safe until the seizure stops naturally by itself. It is important for the public to know how to respond to all seizures, including the most noticeable kind which is the generalized tonic clonic seizure, or convulsions.
Helping a person in an epileptic seizure may depend on the type of seizures they have.

 

Most seizures last less than three minutes, so by the time an emergency medication is ready to be administered, chances are the seizure is over.
The most important thing to do during a seizure is to stay calm and protect the person experiencing the seizure.
People administering first aid for seizures should roll the person to his or her side to prevent choking, remove sharp objects that the person might hit during the seizure, and loosen any tight clothing around the neck. Do not put anything in the person's mouth -- not even medicine or liquid. Sometimes, an ambulance will need to be called, such as if the person having the seizure is pregnant or has diabetes, or if the seizure lasts for more than five minutes.

 

Seizure First Aid

 


If you see someone having a seizure with convulsions or loss of consciousness, here's how you can help:

Roll the person on his or her side to prevent choking on any fluids or vomit.
Cushion the person's head.
Loosen any tight clothing around the neck.
Keep the person's airway open. If necessary, grip the person's jaw gently and tilt his or her head back.
Do NOT restrict the person from moving, unless he or she is in danger.
Do NOT put anything into the person's mouth, not even medicine or liquid. These can cause choking or damage to   the person's jaw, tongue, or teeth. Contrary to widespread belief, people cannot swallow their tongues during a   seizure or any other time.
Remove any sharp or solid objects that the person might hit during the seizure.
Note how long the seizure lasts and what symptoms occurred so you can tell a doctor or emergency personnel if   necessary.
Stay with the person until the seizure ends.

 

Guidelines for Non-Convulsive Seizures

 

 

If you see someone having a non-convulsive seizure, remember that the person's behavior is not intentional. The person may wander aimlessly or make alarming or unusual gestures. You can help by following these guidelines:


-*- Remove any dangerous objects from the area around the person or in his or her path.
-*- Don't try to stop the person from wandering unless he or she is in danger.
-*- Don't shake the person or shout.
-*- Stay with the person until he or she is completely alert.

 

When to Call for help ?

 


Call for emergency assistance if:

• The person is pregnant or has diabetes.
• The seizure happened in water.
• The seizure lasts longer than five minutes.
• The person does not begin breathing again or does not return to consciousness after the seizure stops.
• Another seizure starts before the person regains consciousness.
• The person injures himself or herself during the seizure.

 

First Aid After the Seizure

 


After the seizure ends, the person will probably be groggy and tired. He or she also may have a headache and be confused or embarrassed.
Be patient with the person and try to help him or her find a place to rest if the person is tired or doesn't feel well. If necessary, offer to call a taxi, a friend, or a relative to help the person get home safely.
If you see someone having a non-convulsive seizure, remember that the person's behavior is not intentional. The person may wander aimlessly or make alarming or unusual gestures. You can help by following these guidelines:

Remove any dangerous objects from the area around the person or in his or her path
Don't try to stop the person from wandering, unless he or she is in danger
Don't shake the person or shout
Stay with the person until he or she is completely alert.

 

 

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See Also: See Also: Epilepsy Diagnosis on the Clinical Practic

See Also: Neurophysiology Health Corner

Back to: Epilepsy Awareness Program

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